HOME THE PEACE INDEX - ARCHIVE GRAPHS LINKS NEWSLETTER - ARCHIVE CONTACT US עברית
MAIN --> -->
May 2




The Peace Index:
May 2
 
2011
Survey dates: 29/05/2011 - 30/05/2011

Quick navigation on the page

After Prime Minister Netanyahu’s Visit to the U.S

The public’s views of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s May 2011 visit to Washington are mixed, and are reflected in two different realms: perceptions of Israel’s bilateral relations with the United States and perceptions of the Israel-Arab conflict, and the chances for peace with the Palestinians.

With regard to bilateral relations between Israel and America, the Jewish public in Israel sees Netanyahu’s visit as a success: 61% think he presented a balanced policy that was neither too tough nor too soft. Fifty-four percent also think the visit contributed to strengthening U.S. support for Israel. In the same spirit, 43% believe the visit contributed to improving the relations between Netanyahu and U.S. President Barack Obama (18% say that it damaged relations,  while 32% do not see the visit as affecting the relations between the two at all). There was also a considerable improvement in of the way in which Obama’s position on the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians is perceived: only 31% of the Jewish public now considers Obama’s position to be more pro-Palestinian (a significant drop from last July, when the majority – 57.55% – thought so). Likewise, the rate of respondents who assess Obama’s policy as balanced rose from 28% to 45%, and the percentage of those viewing his position as more pro-Israel rose from 8% in July 2010 to 14% at present.  

With regard to the conflict with the Palestinians, after Netanyahu’s visit, the Jewish public’s assessments regarding what can be expected in the future actually worsened: the rate of those who believe the Palestinians will declare an independent state based on the 1967 borders in September, without an agreement with Israel, and will ask the United Nations to recognize that state now stands at 75%, compared to 64% who thought so before Netanyahu’s visit. Furthermore, even though Obama recently asserted that a unilateral declaration of independence would be a grave mistake, a decisive majority (72%) of the Jewish public believes his statement will not cause the Palestinians to give up their plans to declare a state. Similarly, there was a decline in the rate of those who think Israel could have prevented the Palestinian move: before Netanyahu’s visit, 40% believed Israel could have prevented this move; after Netanyahu’s visit, the rate fell to 35%. There is now a very high level of agreement (71%) among the Jewish public that a large majority of the UN General Assembly will support the Palestinian declaration of independence and will recognize their state (here there has been a certain diminution since before Netanyahu’s visit, when 75% anticipated such a majority). Hence it is not surprising that for the Jewish public, the prevailing opinion is that Netanyahu’s visit to the United States did not affect the chances of advancing the negotiations with the Palestinians (45%), or even damaged them (24%), while only 21% of Jewish respondents said the visit made a positive contribution to advancing peace.

As for the Arab public, Here, too, the prevailing perception is that the visit brought an improvement in Israeli-U.S. relations. Fifty-two percent  of Arab respondents believe the visit contributed to improving the relations between Netanyah and Obama, and 68% think it contributed to strengthening U.S. support for Israel.  However, a large majority (73%) thinks the policy Netanyahu presented was too tough. In addition, 71% (!) of the Arabs think Obama’s policy is too pro-Israel while only 9% see it as too pro-Palestinian.

On the level of Israeli-Palestinian relations, just as before Netanyahu’s visit, a majority (58%) foresees that the Palestinians will not declare an independent state in September and will not request UN recognition for it. There is a split, however, on whether or not a majority of the General Assembly will approve the declaration assuming that the Palestinians do request UN recognition (50% believe there will not be a majority, while 48% believe that there will be). In the Arab public, as in the Jewish, the majority (63%) thinks Obama’s speech will not cause the Palestinians to change their minds. Unlike the Jewish public, however, a majority (55.6%) of the Arab public says Israel could have prevented the Palestinian move if it had shown greater flexibility in negotiations in the past. This clarifies why the majority of the Arab public (56%) believes that Netanyahu’s visit damaged the chances of advancing Israeli-Palestinian peace.
 


The Peace Index is a project of the Evens Program in Mediation and Conflict Resolution at Tel Aviv University and the Israel Democracy Institute. The survey was conducted by telephone from Sunday to Monday, May 29-30, by the Dahaf Institute. The survey included 601 respondents, who constitute a representative sample of the adult Jewish population of Israel. The measurement error for a sample of this size is 4.5%; statistical processing was done by Ms. Yasmin Alkalay.



FILES FOR DOWNLOAD

  click click Data File
  click click Index
  click SPSS

Focus search
FILES FOR DOWNLOAD

  click click Data File
  click click Index
  click SPSS


NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION
Want to remain updated?
Fill in your details
 
 
GRAPHS | NEWSLETTER - ARCHIVE | CONTACT US | TERMS OF USE
LINKS |
  © 2010 All rights reserved